Bergman’s Fårö

It’s quiet.
You’ll notice if you stop and listen.

Either you walk along the pale, bright lighted stone beaches or you sit between the firs filling your bowl with wild strawberries you’ll notice if you stop and listen: It’s quiet. This is where my summers are. 

On a quiet little Swedish island called Fårö. Simple. Humble. Yet it’s stunning. Like if nature trust its own beauty.

 

My grandparents led the way in the 1960s when they first arrived on the tiny ferry and walked to their cottage with my mom and her sisters like little ducklings on a line behind them.

Every summer they returned and as the girls grew up and had their own families they started bringing their children as well. Today, I take my children there.

Why? Tradition. Family time. Bright white light. Saffron pancakes and grilled lamb. Marshmallows and a swim at night.

The Swedish director, Ingmar Bergman was reluctantly taken there on a windy April day when lack of funds forced him to find alternatives to filming at the Orkney Islands.

He ended up living the rest of his life on Fårö and recording some of his most famous movies there.

“If one wished to be solemn, it could be said that I had found my landscape, my real home; if one wished to be unpretentious, one could talk about love at first sight,” he said.